MPP Platform

MPP Technology

Mucus is a barrier for drug delivery

The body is surrounded by boundary tissues that play the important physiological role of preventing foreign bodies from penetrating into the body. The mucus that coats these tissues, the eyes, lung, cervical/vaginal tract and gastrointestinal tract, for example, serves as a protective barrier to trap and eliminate particulate matter, such as viruses, bacteria and allergens, before these agents can enter the underlying tissues and cause infections or elicit reactions. However, in playing this pivotal role of protection, mucus can also hinder medical treatments by limiting the penetration of medications to mucus-protected tissues, thereby reducing their therapeutic effect.

Mucus also makes it difficult to treat many ophthalmic diseases. The body can rapidly eliminate drugs delivered to the eye via the tear film protecting the surface of the eye, which can significantly limit the effectiveness of these drugs. This is the case both for drugs designed to treat conditions in the front of the eye, such as dry eye disease and post-operative inflammation and pain, as well as for drugs designed to treat conditions in the back of the eye, such as retinal diseases. We believe that our proprietary MPP technology has the potential to address this clear unmet medical need for more efficient delivery of drugs administered via topical ocular dosing.

MPP Technology

Our MPPs are selectively-sized nanoparticles and have non-covalent proprietary coatings. We believe that these two key attributes enable even distribution of drug particles on mucosal surfaces and significantly increase drug delivery to target tissues by enhancing mobility of drug particles through mucus and preventing drug particles from becoming trapped and eliminated by mucus. We believe this enables enhanced efficacy at equal or lower doses as well as less frequent dosing for improved patient convenience and compliance.

While a significant portion of conventionally formulated ophthalmic drugs are rapidly eliminated via the tear film, we have shown that our MPPs are capable of achieving higher concentration on the surface of the eye, thereby enabling the active drug substance to reach cells in the underlying ocular tissue at higher levels.

The graphic below illustrates the ability of our MPP drug nanoparticles to penetrate the tear and membrane-bound mucins to reach the ocular surface, as compared to conventional, non-coated particles, which adhere to the mucins in the tear film and are cleared with the tears through blinking.

This graphic is included for illustrative purposes only and is not intended to provide a complete representation of the way in which our MPP drug nanoparticles interact with the ocular surface.
This graphic is included for illustrative purposes only and is not intended to provide a complete representation of the way in which our MPP drug nanoparticles interact with the ocular surface.

Application of MPP Technology for Delivery of Drugs to the Eye:

Our initial focus is to leverage our MPP technology to enhance delivery of drugs into the eye. In preclinical studies, KPI-121 demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic characteristics and increased drug penetration into ocular tissues as compared to a branded form of LE. In a preclinical study of ocular inflammation in rabbits, KPI-121 0.5% administered four times a day, or QID, showed a larger reduction of inflammation as compared to a branded form of LE 0.5% given QID, as measured by the mean aqueous humor cell counts after intravitreal injection. We also administered either 0.4% KPI-121 or 0.5% branded LE to the eyes of two groups of rabbits. As illustrated in the line graph below, the concentrations of LE in aqueous humor, a transparent gelatinous fluid that fills the anterior and posterior chambers between the lens and the cornea, of the rabbit eyes treated with KPI-121 were more than three times higher than the rabbit eyes treated with branded LE 30 minutes after dosing, at a 20% lower concentration.

We administered KPI-121 0.5%, branded LE 0.5%, or 0.5% of an LE non-MPP nanoparticle, to the eyes of three groups of rabbits and measured the amount of LE that was delivered to the cornea. The non-MPP nanoparticle was similar in size to our MPP nanoparticles but lacked the proprietary surface coating used in our MPP nanoparticles. As illustrated in the line graph below, concentrations of LE in the cornea of the rabbit eyes treated with KPI-121 were more than three times higher than the concentrations in rabbits treated with branded LE between 20 and 40 minutes after dosing. In addition, the rabbit eyes treated with the non-MPP nanoparticles had concentrations of LE similar to that in the rabbit eyes treated with branded LE and did not display the improved drug bioavailability properties observed with KPI-121. We believe these results highlight the importance of our proprietary MPP technology and show that KPI-121’s improved pharmacokinetic profile has the potential to reduce the dosing strength and/or frequency of administration of LE with KPI-121 as compared to branded LE.

We also have demonstrated the potential of our MPP nanoparticles to increase the mucus penetration of over fifteen classes of drugs. While our current focus is in ophthalmology, in preclinical studies, our MPP technology has been effective in delivering drugs to the lungs, cervical/vaginal tract, gastrointestinal tract and other mucus-protected tissues. We have the ability to vary the rate of drug release as appropriate for the targeted disease state and tissue. As a result, drugs can be delivered either in rapid release formulations or as sustained release formulations that slowly release drug over a time period that ranges from hours to days.